Schueco Glazing Enhances Views of Chichester Harbour

There are many people whose dream is to live in an energy-efficient, easy-to manage house that has been specially created to meet their individual needs. Since such home-owners will almost always engage an architect, the resultant houses are very often contemporary in design and make use of the most up-to-date building techniques and materials.

Entrance Elevation

This presents Schueco Residential Partners with a significant opportunity because the quality of Schueco systems makes them the natural choice for high-end, bespoke properties. Brightwater, a sleek, 4,000 sq ft, two-storey private house with a triple garage, overlooking Chichester Harbour, is an example of this type of project.

Designed by Des Ewing of Des Ewing Residential Architects and finished in soft white self-coloured render with contrasting dark stone cladding, Brightwater has a flat roof with extensive glazing which provides wonderful views of the harbour, enhanced by corner windows.

The overall effect of a home flooded with light and warmth is due in no small measure to the extensive use of a variety of Schueco systems that combine good looks with exceptional levels of insulation. In addition, whatever the type of system, all the profiles match perfectly together, delivering an important uniformity of design throughout the house.

The Schueco systems specified at Brightwater include FWS 50+ curtain walling (Ug value: 1.1 W/m2K), AWS 70.HI windows (Uw value: 1.3 W/m2K), an AWS/ADS 70.HI hinged door (Uw value: 1.6 Wm2K) and most significantly, several sets of ASS 70.HI lift-and-slide doors with slimline central interlock (Uw value: 1.5 Wm2k).

Lift-and-slide Schueco doors

These doors, which provide access to the patios and all the balconies on the first floor, have stylish Schueco stainless steel door furniture and an ultra-low threshold of just 25 mm so that the danger of tripping is virtually eliminated.

Des Ewing is unequivocal about his practice’s preference for using Schueco products: ‘We always specify Schueco systems as we know that clients will like their appearance and their ease of operation. We also know from experience of around twenty recent installations that they will prove extremely reliable over the years to come.’

Brightwater has been designed so that the extensive kitchen, living room and dining area all enjoy harbour views, while the snug and the study face inland. The first floor – which benefits from light streaming in through the Schueco window and door systems – has a master suite with two bathrooms and a large dressing space; the three remaining bedrooms are equipped with dressing rooms and en-suite facilities.

A Schueco AWS 70 double-height feature window in the hallway allows the morning light to penetrate deep into the building’s interior and, at dusk, lights up the circular glass-sided staircase in the hall. The latter is the focal point of the house and all the rooms lead from it.

The excellent thermal performance of the Schueco systems means that despite the large areas of glazing, overall energy consumption in the house remains very low, delivering important environmental benefits and economical energy bills.

All the Schueco systems in Brightwater were fabricated and installed by Croydon-based DG Glass Designs, a highly experienced and expanding aluminium and glass specialist that is active on projects across London and the South-East.

Home Improvements – Ask the Expert – Des Ewing

As published in Ireland’s Homes Interiors & Living Magazine, May 2018…

Current trends and what clients want:

  • Many older properties have layouts which just don’t suit modern living, with a maze of smaller, separate rooms, linked by dark corridors, with small hallways and long narrow landings all commonplace. So it is no wonder that many renovators choose to remodel these internal spaces to create a freer flowing, open layout. Doing this means removing walls, which in some cases is a simple job. However, when the wall is load-bearing and plays a significant role in the structural integrity of the rest of the house, then it can be a little more complicated.
  • The main criteria clients ask for is space and a better use of it. They want a higher quality specification finish with much more integrated joinery items. Something that is often requested is a better connection with the garden and external areas, with maybe a covered space with outdoor heaters and smaller suntrap patio. External garden lighting is necessary to make the space look as good as possible in the evening and clients are spending an increasing amount of semi-mature planting which is now more readily available at a reasonable cost.
  • Nowadays people and especially children have so much paraphernalia that adequate storage is essential. American ‘mud rooms’, which are attractive storage areas accessed via the back door, are a recent import but go down very well in N. Ireland.
  • Clients are currently tending to stay away from natural stone and instead are using larger format tiles which look like stone but are cheaper and more durable.
  • The days of the safe-tones of grey house appear to be fading with colour and texture making a comeback. Traditional favourites of salvage terracotta and terrazzo are becoming more and more prevalent again.

 

Tips:

It is important not to view a renovation project as a chance to live out your house dreams unfettered. A series of extensions and renovations that not only towers over the original but takes away all its character will look wrong in scale and not work as a house. In such a scenario it would be better to consider a new build — indeed many renovation design schemes become so grand that the homeowners conclude it might be wiser to knock it down and start again (saving 20% on the VAT).

A well thought-out schedule of works is absolutely vital to the success and smooth running of any renovation project. Without one the whole process can become chaotic, with tradespeople overlapping and many jobs that could have been carried out at the same time to save on costs being done separately. A schedule basically lists what work needs to be done to the house to get it complete, and in what order. Everything should be included, right down to the tiniest detail.

A significant number of renovation and extension projects won’t need planning permission at all. These include internal improvements that don’t affect the external look of the building and extensions of a small scale. These are classed as Permitted Development and you can guidance on what works fall under this category on your local planning authority website https://www.planningni.gov.uk/pps07_addendum_annexb_permitted – in N. Ireland. Other larger scale renovations will require planning approval in the usual way. It is essential to take into account any designations that might exist where you live, e.g. Conservation Areas, Areas of Townscape Character or Outstanding Natural Beauty as these could really impact your plans and your need for Planning Approval. If your home is listed or is a protected structure, you will require Listed Building Consent as well as Planning Permission.

One of the easiest ways to ruin your house whilst actually trying to improve it, is by getting the windows wrong — wrong materials, wrong proportions, wrong position, wrong furniture, wrong glazing. If you are renovating a house that has the original windows still in place – likely to be timber or metal – then do all you can to rescue them before you even consider replacing. Avoid replacing period windows with plastic versions — they will never look truly authentic in a period context. Draught and noise problems can be improved by fitting sashes with new seals and secondary glazing is also an option. In some extreme cases the cost of repair work does not practically make sense and you may need to consider sympathetic, matching replacements.

When opening up internal spaces, changes in floor level often have to be taken into account and are common in older properties. Bear this in mind when considering knocking two rooms into one as getting the floors level will add to costs.

Extensions:

A good design starts in many cases with a good survey of what you’ve got and what state it is in. There’s no point in building an elaborate extension if you are going to have to carry out disruptive work to the drains beneath the floor later on, for instance. So take stock, and get a surveyor in as part of the early design process.

Ground conditions, site access, location and proximity of services, design and size — all have a big impact on what the cost of your extension will be and for this reason, it is difficult to give an exact idea of costs. However, extensions always tend to be more expensive that people think so keep it simple and small.

All extensions require Building Control Approval. Building Regs. are there to ensure that minimum design and construction standards are achieved and cover things such as fire safety, insulation, drainage and access.

Extensions can be in keeping or in stark contrast to the original house — either can be a success as long as it is well designed and considers the original building. Pay attention to the issues around the changing roofline, and of course ensure that the materials (particularly claddings, coverings and windows) have coherence to them as a whole house, rather than treating the extension as completely separate.  Consider include plenty of glazing in the form of aluminium or timber windows or folding sliding doors. Letting more light into the space you have by means of larger windows and particularly roof lights can make spaces feel larger and happier and don’t cost much for the return.

Design-wise, it often makes more sense to build a contrasting extension that proudly shouts about its status as a new addition, yet complements and draws out the best elements of the existing building. Sometimes adding large extensions can be to the detriment of the remaining space as it can block light making the spaces less pleasant. In N. Ireland successful residential architecture is about natural light and proportion, making it elegant and beautiful. Clients often worry about how to overcome privacy issues yet still get light into their extensions. There are lots of great alternatives to traditional windows. Banks of rooflights, roof lanterns, glazed doors (both internal and external), rows of windows set just below ceiling level and above the eye level or alternative types of privacy glazing are all possible solutions.

Matching extensions are arguably much more difficult – and often expensive – to get right compared to contemporary extensions, making an extension appear as though it has always been there takes skill and attention to detail. In order for this style of extension to work, not only must the materials you use match the originals as closely as possible (using reclaimed or local materials is key), but you should also aim to copy the main design elements. These include the roof pitch and details such as the brick bond and even the mortar colour. Windows are also massively important, in terms of materials, style and size — make sure their proportions are in keeping with the rest of the house too. Matching bricks for many is the most difficult challenge but also essential to a ‘period’ extension’s success and don’t forget to match the mortar.

One of the most popular, least disruptive and cost-effective ways of adding another room to a house is to convert the existing loft. Much of the mess and disruption associated with other extensions can be contained with a loft conversion, with rubbish often going straight out through a waste shoot. The only form of major disruption comes with the fitting of the new staircase on the floor below. A straightforward loft conversion, carried out by builders or a loft conversion specialist, should only take around four to five weeks. The main area which can incur extra cost and time is the plumbing and electrics. Most loft conversions fall under Permitted Development rights however you will require Building Control Approval. Building Regulations state that if the loft is to be converted into a bedroom, playroom, study or bathroom, there must be a permanent staircase.

Using underused spaces like garages and formal dining rooms is an economical way to add useable space at little cost. If your home comes with an integral garage, you might find that the space is better served as additional living accommodation than for the storage of bikes and tools -as they are never used for cars! Integral garages are usually located near utilities and can be extended into as pantries or enlarged kitchens.  Work does not tend to need planning permission but will need Building Control Approval — there are also some fire safety issues to consider. One of the key tasks is to level the floors (garages have to be at least 100mm lower than the dwelling’s usual level) and can usually be made up by adding a damp-proof membrane if required and sufficient floor insulation. As your existing garage wall will likely have single leaf construction, you will need to apply a compound or waterproofing breather membrane to the walls, along with insulation which can be hidden behind plasterboard as part of an inner leaf.

 

Sourcing an Architect:

The scale of your project may be such that the services of an Architect are just not needed, but if you are extending or carrying out major remodelling work, you should not underestimate what an Architect could bring to the table. They have the experience and expertise to get the very most from your space and your budget and could well offer ideas and solutions beyond what you had considered possible. They will also have connections with local tradespeople and may have a relationship with the local planners — as well as some knowledge of what they are and aren’t willing to accept. They will also be able to submit your plans and advise you on any red tape surrounding your application. A lot of an Architects job is to not get it wrong -to help the client avoid making mistakes and wasting money.

Selecting an Architect is difficult as you don’t really know if you will work well together until you get started. Go for one that loves to do residential work and is enthusiastic about the project. Experience is important but hard work is essential. It is always beneficial to go on the recommendations of others, particularly if you are impressed with their completed projects however a useful starting place maybe to contact your local professional body for architects, so either the RSUA or RIAI to search for registered architects in your area. Here you will find all the necessary contact details and websites to help you create a shortlist of possibilities.  Prior to commencing any project, it is imperative to understand the need to perhaps also employ other consultants such as a Structural Engineer or Quantity Surveyor to work alongside the Architect to ensure the works are carried out as proficiently as possible and to budget. The number of other consultants recommended will vary depending on the scale of the project and the inclusion of any specialist items but it is something to be wary of and consider from an early stage.

 

Des Ewing

 

Cool & Contemporary Living

This ultra trendy high specification home enjoys a top location in Belfast’s popular Stranmillis area. Built in 2011, it was designed by leading local architect Des Ewing to provide stylish living for professionals and families.

Cool and modern living in Belfast.

Front Elevation

Inside is around 2,600sq ft of beautifully finished, contemporary accommodation laid out over four floors.

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan (Entrance Level)

Third Floor Plan

There are four bedrooms, master with en suite shower room and built-in wardrobes, an open plan kitchen/living/dining area, a large lounge, a snug, family bathroom, utility, ground floor cloakroom and two walk in store rooms. Oversized contemporary black framed glazing is a main feature throughout the property.

Cool and modern living in Belfast.

Rear Elevation

This modern home has also been fitted with smart technology and has a ‘whole house’ audio/video system from Elan G which can be controlled with an iPad.

Smart Home Technology

It delivers a variety of audio and video sources such as satellite, TV, CCTV, radio, digital music etc to 10 zones around the home without the need for cabling or devices. All of the rooms are fitted with ceiling speakers and the main zones are fitted with surround sound. The home control system is linked to the alarm, CCTV and garden lighting and can be further expanded if desired.

You know you have arrived somewhere special immediately as the property enjoys a private setting behind electric gates.

Impressive solid wood double entrance doors open into the hallway.

Entrance Hallway

Oak driftwood flooring and a solid balustrade formed from plaster and painted white with a stainless steel handrail is the first of many contemporary designer features.

There is a ground floor cloakroom with bespoke storage units and WC. A utility room is fitted to match the main kitchen by Springfarm Joinery with stainless steel sink and plumbing for a washing machine and tumble dryer.

Cool and modern living in Belfast.

Kitchen

The bright kitchen/living/dining room opens via large sliding glass doors onto a glass balcony overlooking the beautiful back garden. White units and bespoke wall cladding by Springfarm Joinery are topped with Mistral Winter Drift worktops. All the appliances are included and there is a Miele fridge/freezer, microwave, oven and glass extractor plus a Bosch gas hob and dishwasher.

Cool and modern living in Belfast.

Dining / Living Area

More oak driftwood flooring keeps the space sleek and contemporary and there is even a space created for your flat screen TV.

Cool and modern living in Belfast.

Lounge

The main lounge is a vast open space with a lovely Gazco bespoke fireplace and contemporary glass sliding doors opening onto the back garden. This great space is also finished with oak driftwood flooring.

There is also a cosy snug or study which leads into a large walk in storage room.

The bedrooms are all bright, spacious and contemporary in finish and styling. The master has more of those fabulous floor to ceiling sliding glass doors which opens onto a contemporary glass balcony.

Cool and modern living in Belfast.

Master Bedroom

It also has bespoke built in storage by Springfarm Joinery and a ready-made space for your TV. The en suite is accessed via an oversized sliding door which makes another design feature and inside is a shower, wash hand basin, large mirror with shelf, a chrome towel rail and more attractive storage built by Springfarm Joinery.

The family bathroom is a decadent space with part tiled walls and ceramic tiled floor and as well as a bath, there is a shower cubicle, chrome towel rail and another oversized mirror with projecting shelf surround.

Outside is a delight with a large, private back garden which has been extensively landscaped and sculpted by award-winning landscape designer Kevin Cooper. It offers a wonderful private oasis for outdoor entertaining and features multiple terraces, a reflecting pool, greenhouse and wood fire pizza oven.

Landscaped Gardens

This property is currently on the market, so for more information on cool & contemporary living click here.

La Dolce Vita

Colin and Barbara Barry had always wanted to self-build on a site with sea views, and when a large plot in Co. Down completely open to the sea on three sides came up for sale, they didn’t hesitate in taking this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. When you have, as Colin and Barbara did, a very clear idea of the setting and type of house you want to build, getting it all together is quite a tall order. The germ of the plan took hold when the couple were on holiday in Italy, as Colin explained:

 

‘We spent a holiday at Lake Garda in northern Italy and just loved the way the villas are built around the steep hillside bordering the Lake. The setting is fantastic and I knew exactly where, back home, we could get the same feeling, so when the site was put up for sale in 2006 we moved quickly to secure it.’

From the facades and layout of the house it is evident that the influence of Italy was more than a sense of place, the style is, as Colin described it ‘Irish Palladian’.

‘I love the symmetry of the ancient buildings in Rome and especially those of Andrea Palladio, but also, in the modern era, the fabulous Art Deco period villas on Long Island, New York state, and Miami.’

The result is a house with an international feel yet quite distinctively Irish.

Although new to self-building, the couple had plenty of experience of building as they had completely restored the house they were living in, a Listed building, and prior to that, renovated a modern house. In his day job, Colin has a background in large residential and commercial building. With this knowledge and interest, was it not tempting to do the designing himself? Colin was emphatic in his response:

‘Designing and building a house are two very different things and I had no hesitation in using an architect. It was his job to make all our ideas work in practical terms as well as distilling our thoughts on style into a form that we were happy with and that would work. The architect we knew because he’d already built a house for my brother in the area and the builder had worked for our family before on other projects. We were very fortunate in having these connections already established because it was quite a complicated build, and good communication and understanding were essential.’

Given the unusual design, its size and location, it would not have been a surprise to hear that gaining planning permission was a long, tortuous process, but not so. The site had originally been passed for the erection of two separate dwellings so the change to one large family home represented considerable planning gain, and permission was granted following some minor adjustments to the design.

The house is of masonry construction using 9”/230mm concrete blocks laid flat for sound attenuation and to create thermal mass. With three teenage children, the couple were particularly aware of the importance of both of these!

‘We wanted them to be able to bring their friends to the house but without us feeling as if we were living in a hotel!’ explained Colin. ‘The children chose what they wanted in their bedrooms which are large enough to have several people staying over, as well as which, on the top floor we have a multi-purpose room with a cinema screen; it’s also a place to play loud music without everyone else hearing it. The concrete beams and insulation between the floors means we can still enjoy peace and quiet downstairs.’

The family were allowed a ‘wish list’ of what they wanted, which is at first glance surprising for what they left out.

‘We have plenty of space for a swimming pool and tennis court’ Colin continued, ‘but nobody was enthusiastic. The tennis court we’d had at our previous house and I admit it was rarely used, the swimming pool might have been voted for if they’d been younger. Nowadays kids prefer to have their friends round or to go out.’

Predictably though, they all requested showers with body jets and in their rooms, a TV screen and internet access.

The question of using renewable energies was considered in the same way as the fabric and interiors, from a very aesthetic as well as practical point of view.

‘We looked at having both solar panels and a geothermal heat pump, but the panels would have been an eyesore on the roof and the cost of digging down for the heat pumps was huge. What we have been able to do, apart from fully fill the wall cavity with insulation, is to use an air source heat pump for hot water in summer. Otherwise it is a mains gas boiler and, apart from an open fire in the hallway – which we’ve yet to use – there are gas fires in the living areas and it also powers the AGA cooker. Although it cost an extra £800/€1,020, we put in a management system for the AGA and that has proved very effective in controlling the timing and temperature.’

The warm roof construction ensures maximum use of the space inside and out with the projecting balconies a magical place to sit and watch the sun go down across the Lough and the hills beyond. As darkness falls, the blinds lower and curtains close; both are part of a system that’s clever enough to adjust to the time of sunset throughout the year, automatically. Even if the weather is poor, huge windows, (these and the Bangor Blue roofing slates were among the more significant parts of the build), provide almost the same experience. The curved glass in the projecting bays softens the seaward façade and contrasts with the geometric gables and tall rectangular chimneys. These curves are echoed inside with the wide sweeping staircase leading to a semi-circular balcony, giving access to the upper rooms.

Whilst her husband was keeping a watchful eye on site, Barbara was busy at her computer sourcing the fixtures and fittings for the interior, one of which is a stunning chandelier. Many a stately home owner must envy the motorised lowering for easy cleaning!

A Grand Design this home may be, but the use of marble flooring throughout and soft tones with splashes of colour create an interior whose stylish simplicity highlights the inventiveness of the design. Few changes were made in the course of the build, but one very visible as you walk through the front door, is the use of curved walls which just ask to be followed, to find out what lies behind and beyond.

In the classic 1960’s film La Dolce Vita, the main character (a journalist), searches in vain for ‘the sweet life’ in Rome. If the film were to be re-created, then Colin and Barbara’s wonderful house and location would provide the perfect set, only this time the story has a happy ending.

House size: c15,000sqft/372sqM
Site size: 2 acres
EPC: 83
Airtightness: 2.73

Builder: MG Construction, 3 Ballytrustan Road, Downpatrick, Co. Down BT30 7AQ Tel. 028 4484 1368 www.mgconstruction.com
Windows: Dask Timber Products Ltd., Meenan Mill, Dublin Road, Loughbrickland, Banbridge, Co. Down BT32 3PB Tel. 028 3831 8696
Stone cladding & porch: McMonagle Stone, Turrishill, Mountcharles, Co. Donegal Tel. 074 973 5061
Sanitary ware, AGA: Haldane Fisher Ltd., Shepherd’s Way, Carnbane Industrial Estate, Newry, Co. Down BT35 6QQ Tel. 028 3026 3201 www.haldane-fisher.com
Kitchen: Robinson Interiors, 10 Boucher Way, Belfast BT12 6RE Tel. 028 9068 3838 www.robinsoninteriors.com
Granite worktop & marble tile flooring: A Robinson & Sons, 14 Main Street, Annalong, Newry, Co. Down BT34 4TR Tel. 028 4376 8213 www.arobinson.co.uk
Slates: Lagan Building Solutions Ltd., 11b Sheepwalk Road, Lisburn, Co. Antrim BT28 3RD www.lbsproducts.com
Plaster moulding: Nicholl Plaster Mouldings, 81 Knockbracken Road, Belfast BT6 9SP Tel. 028 9044 8410
Audio Visual & Sonos sound system, alarm, home cinema: iHome, 43 Ballynafern Road, Banbridge, Co. Down BT32 5BW Tel. 028 4065 1331 www.i-home.co.uk
Bedroom carpets: Martin Phillips, 9a Portaferry Road, Newtownards, Co. Down BT23 8NN Tel. 028 9181 8227 www.martinphillipscarpets.co.uk
Structural Engineer: Structures 2000 Ltd., 9 Grange Park, Magherafelt, Co L’derry BT45 5RT Tel. 028 7963 3876 www.s2kltd.com
Quantity Surveyor: Naylor & Devlin, 95 Malone Avenue, Belfast BT9 6EQ Tel. 028 9066 9118 www.naylor-devlin.com
Mechanical & Electrical: Dynamic Design, 20A Newry Street, Banbridge Co. Down BT32 2HA Tel. 028 4062-3377 www.dynamicdesign.org
Insulation: Kingspan Insulation, Castleblaney, Co. Monaghan Tel. 042 979 5000 www.kingspaninsulation.ie
Landscaping: Park-Hood, Hawarden House, 163 Upper Newtownards Road, Belfast BT4 3HZ Tel. 028 9029 8020, www.parkhood.com
Instantaneous hot water tap: Quooker www.quooker.co.uk
Photography: Paul Lindsay at Christopher Hill, 17 Clarence Street, Belfast, BT2 8DY, Tel: 028 9024 5038 www.scenicireland.com

This 10,000 sq ft British home is as epic as you’d expect – Homify Article

This luxurious 10,000 sq ft beauty is located in a much sought-after ‘Area of Townscape Character’. It stands comfortably in a site of half an acre with expertly landscaped gardens that respect the enforced Tree Preservation Order on the site.

Sound good? Then let’s start exploring!

A dream design

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Through cast-iron gates, we enter the property on which this dream creation is built. This bespoke home was designed with a formal, elegant yet simple entrance block, with a glazed sunroom to one side and a stone block to the other, looking like a converted coach house.

The sunroom offers views to all aspects of the gardens while still ensuring adequate privacy for the family. The neat smooth render is complemented by the fine painted hardwood windows and restrained granite sills.

A most amazing entryway

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As far as first impressions go, this entryway definitely took our breaths away…

The finely detailed curved stair to one side of this impressive hall appears to just float in this space and is definitely calling out to be climbed.  The formal rooms are positioned to flank the entrance, with the main living- and dining areas of modern living catered for and enjoyed towards the rear of the property.

Bright and brilliant

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The upper floors, which are also bright and airy, provide voluminous bedrooms, en-suites and generous storage space. And thanks to ingenious planning and fabulous designs, each and every room you enter provides an incredibly bright and delicately rich style.

First-class views

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The main living- and dining areas overlook and open onto textured stone terraces, some offering shelter with lightly detailed glazed embellished steel structures. Allowing this visual link between the indoors and spacious outside definitely aids in allowing the interior areas of the house to feel even grander – not that it needs to, obviously.

Let’s have a look at few more images of this delightful design.

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This article was featured on HOMIFY. Written by JOHANNES VAN GRAAN

This British country home is what dreams are made of – Homify Article

The structure we’ll be checking out? A most elegant family home that combines a formal exterior with a more contemporary free-flowing interior, built on a restricted site. For many, the word classical is synonymous with Georgian design, yet the experts in charge wanted to get away from a traditional Georgian style on this site. In fact, the results are closer to that of the Italian master Palladio than to anything British.

Garden touches

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We all know the importance of first impressions, which is why professional landscape architect, Beth Moore, implemented a scheme to soften the impact of the house on what is actually a relatively small plot.

At the front is a formal garden, planted with herbs and agapanthus, and hedging is being established to soften the boundary lines. The two mature trees on site have been retained and the semi-walled garden to the rear has climbers trained up it.

A glowing vision

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The house’s unique design has been made so that there is very little circulation space; in fact, there are no long corridors anywhere, resulting in the usable living- and accommodation spaces being made the most of.

Here we get to stare in wonder at the circular atrium lit from above which forms central circulation space and lights up all three floors of this Italian-inspired mansion.

A visual break

 

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The sloping site is reflected within the house by incorporating dramatic steps between rooms. In the kitchen area, these steps are used to create a visual break between the interlinked spaces such as cooking, dining, living etc.

Interior style

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Although the structure itself flaunts a classic, elegant look, the furniture and décor pieces within the house speak of varied design styles, especially the open-plan kitchen and dining area, where country, classic and modern pieces can be glimpsed. And let’s not forget the delicate dose of colours and patterns which inject some striking character into the interiors!

Let’s scope out a few more images, shall we?

 

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This article was featured on HOMIFY. Written by JOHANNES VAN GRAAN

The ultimate fun house for a family with 5 kids – Homify Article

For today’s homify 360° discovery, we want to shift our focus ever so slightly from adult-preferred style to child-friendly (and –favourite) designs. To find out exactly what we mean, you’ll just have to continue reading and scrolling…

London team Des Ewing Residential Architects deserve a world of praise for this 418 m² creation that has become home to a family with five young children. The house is designed to be practical, durable and fun, yet also brings more than its fair share when it comes to contemporary cuteness!

A clean design

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Walking past this house (or seeing a photograph of it) provides no single clue as to the magic included in its design. Yes, from the outside we can definitely appreciate its clean lines, high ceilings and extensive aluminium-framed glazing facing the views of the sea.

We can also write heaps about its monochrome colour scheme, how its natural green slate roof tops the white rendered walls with an olive green base and how it reflects the roof colour.

But let’s get to the creative, child-friendly portion…

Downstairs in a jiffy

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Even though teleportation devices don’t exist (yet), the designers of this house have developed another equally fast way to move the kiddies from their first-floor bedrooms straight to the kitchen table downstairs: this bespoke slide which definitely helps in ensuring everyone’s on time (and wearing great, big smiles) for school!

The kitchen

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But seeing as this is homify, a certain amount of mature style is required, so let’s focus on the aforementioned kitchen for just a moment!

Flaunting sleek finishes, a linear design and a firm commitment to functionality, this two-in-one cooking- and dining space should be every modern-style lover’s dream design. And just check out the fabulous garden views and natural lighting seeping indoors.

But there’s more…

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Right, back to the child-friendly designs that make this house one of our ultimate favourites! Although it can’t be seen here, a zip-wire through the wooded section of the garden continues the rapid transit theme (and is, of course, a bonus for keeping the kids entertained outdoors).

In addition, the zigzag, five-metre wide steps in the garden form a seated amphitheatre for the rear terrace, which also doubles as a basketball arena.

Shall we scope out a few more images of this house?

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This article was featured on HOMIFY. Written by JOHANNES VAN GRAAN

This Victorian-style home is actually a fab new build – Homify Article

London team Des Ewing Residential Architects bring us our newest homify 360° discovery: a new-build replica home set in a conservation area. But this project’s background story is as interesting as the end results are striking…

The planning process to achieve permission for this scale of replacement dwelling extended over two years and required two planning applications, given its sensitive location. The planning authority is generally against new development on this main avenue, as it is located within a Conservation Area. This resulted in the professionals in charge having to demonstrate that their proposed replacement dwelling was of greater quality than the building it would replace.

This was achieved by having discussions, presenting 3D models to show the new building fitting into its setting, and by ensuring that they detailed the external brickwork to match neighbouring properties as closely as possible.

Scope out the breathtaking results below…

The front façade

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The pretty-as-a-picture dwelling, in all its classic-style glory, flaunts quite a number of eye-catching touches, including the pitched roofing, warm-hued walls, the fabulously textured façade and some bay windows for extra charm.

And let’s not forget the delightful garden touches adding even more visual appeal to the house’s front side.

Freshness seeping indoors

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Things take a more modern turn (style-wise, at least) on the inside, especially here in the kitchen that becomes visually one with the beautifully crafted garden, thanks to generous glass sliding doors blending the two areas.

Expert landscaping

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And speaking of gardens, how dream-like is this exterior space with its plants, stone flooring, bench designs and host of other equally impressive touches? The ideal spot to host a fabulous get-together with friends, or just enjoy a spot of tea by yourself.

Architects, gardeners, and many more – we have them all here on homify. See our professionals page for more info.

Style that never snoozes4

We knew even from the outside that the rooms presenting those bay windows would be most charming indeed – and we are not disappointed at all by this bedroom! Flaunting a soft-grey colour palette, the bedroom’s charms are enhanced even further thanks to the abundance of plush fabrics adorning not only the bed, but also the window treatment!

Let’s enjoy a few more high-quality images, shall we?

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This article was featured on HOMIFY. Written by JOHANNES VAN GRAAN

 

Is this the UK’s most incredible fisherman’s cottage? – Homify Article

Our latest homify 360° gem comes to us from London team Des Ewing Residential Architects. The project that they’ve agreed to share with us? A new dwelling added to a row of fisherman’s cottages – something a little bit different than what we usually have here on homify, right?

This project was started because the existing end terrace of a row of fishermen’s cottages had been unsympathetically modified over the years and had fallen into poor repair. Planning permission was obtained for a single replacement dwelling which, on initial appearance, seems to be two cottages.

By continuing the rhythm of the original row, the enlarged dwelling blends with its original neighbours and is an improvement to this Area of Townscape Character.

The exterior façade

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The dwelling’s exposed location necessitates clipped eaves, bush hammered granite cills, and aluminium-clad sliding sash windows. The front terrace and parking areas are finished in York stone and basalt cobbles. There is no exposed timber except for the heavy hardwood front door, which has been turned 90° to provide shelter from the prevailing winds.

The entryway

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Upon entering we can immediately start appreciating the abundance of natural lighting that seeps indoors, not to mention the beautiful views.

The cottages overlook the boatyard and the sea beyond. And although the main kitchen/living/dining areas also have sea views, they are private from the coastal path that passes in front of the house.

Light-filled spaces

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French doors open onto a sheltered patio at the rear that catches the sun until late in the day. And here we can see the freshness that filters indoors and spreads around the entire open-plan layout, including that delightfully styled kitchen around the corner.

Eye-catching touches

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We just love the patterned carpet that not only adorns the staircase, but also adds a decent amount of colour and motif to the top floor areas – so much so that additional décor pieces aren’t even required!

Shall we scope out a few more images of this charming sea-facing home?

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This article was featured on HOMIFY. Written by JOHANNES VAN GRAAN